Robert Harding

Seven Poles

December 31, 1972–January 13, 1973 112 Greene Street/Workshop
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972

Participating Artist

Robert Harding, Bruce Cleveland, Anne Cleveland, Gigi Harding, T.J., and Sue Rich

Exhibition Description

“‘Seven Poles’ was performed nightly for two weeks, beginning on New Year’s Eve, 1972-73. ‘Nostalgia, Sea, Epiphany, Stone, Conjunction, Musical, and Light’ were all aspects of ‘Seven Poles.’ I created these pieces especially for 112 Greene Street during the Autumn of 1972. As the titles suggest, the works were elusive, poetic, mythic, and difficult. They were dance-theatre and media pieces employing video and sound tracks.

The dancers, including myself, wore masks and costumes that had created for these works and an earlier piece called ‘Network’. We created musical instruments by stretching piano wires across the gallery and made combinations of wooden frames and piano wire that were strange, antique-looking, sculptural instruments. The dancers played the instruments often during the performances. We used the whole gallery, sometimes covering the floor with black polyethylene sheets. used a lot of cheesecloth and black net cloth.

The atmosphere was mystical-quasi-religious-mysterious. One aim was to relate to the audience, and as a result devised special dance movements using ropes, mirrors, and other props to pull the theatre space and the audience space together.” [Brentano, R., & Savitt, M. (1981). 112 Workshop, 112 Greene Street: History, artists & artworks. New York: New York University Press]

Press Release

Press release for "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Press release for "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972
Performance view from "Robert Harding: Seven Poles," 1972