Paul Bloodgood

June 29–September 15, 2018 East Gallery
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are twelve abstract paintings of varying sizes and one text collage: three works installed on the left wall and ten on the back wall. In the foreground of the image in the lower left corner is a partial view of a vitrine including printed material.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Eight works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: three on the left wall and five on the right. With the exception of the text collage on the far right, all the works pictured consist of abstract paintings.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are thirteen abstract paintings varying in size: ten paintings are installed on the back wall and three on the right.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Seven works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: four on the right and three on the left. The four paintings on the right share certain aesthetic similarities including airier compositions with lots of negative space, uncertain marks that resemble characteristics of a landscape and scrambled perspectives. The three on the right are denser in composition, share more decisive marks, and are flatter in perspective.) 

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Frontal view of a wall with an arched entrance to the foyer of the gallery. A framed text collage, Page as Essay (Page 2); flames, confusion, + car is installed on the left side of the arch. On the right side of the arch another framed text collage, Jack's Name Painting, is installed on top of an abstract, modestly sized, landscape orientation painting titled Valis Study. Valis Study depicts a few organic marks, some black and some marbled with earth tones and light blues, on an off-white background. To the far right of the wall is a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting titled Three dividing, two uniting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown. A text poem and painting on a wall in the foyer are also visible through the arch.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Four works installed on two walls in the foyer of the gallery- each wall has a framed text collage to the left of a painting. Between the two walls is the entrance to an adjacent gallery. The text collages are identical in size. The landscape-orientation painting on the right wall, Study for Dover-Foxcroft is smaller than X After 1000, the portrait orientation painting on the right wall. Both paintings depict expressive natural scenes in similar styles, with slightly different compositions and perspectives. Study for Dover-Foxcroft has a clear horizon that separates the muted sky from the lush field of grass. The ground is full of rocks and a few trees with foliage while there are lots of bare, twisted branches throughout the whole painting. X After 1000 evokes the perspective and compositions of older Chinese landscape scroll paintings, featuring tall rocks and a few trees in a diagonal formation from the bottom left corner to the top right corner and some trees and shrubs in the foreground.) 

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with one white column in the middle. There are three vitrines leading to a wall in the background which has two arches that lead to the foyer of the gallery. On the wall there are two works installed all the way to the left, two in between the arches, and two on the right.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the items include: a poster for Isa Genzken,  signed cards, a publication from 303 Gallery, and a poster for a group exhibition titled Poor Man's Pudding Rich Man's Crumb which included Doug Aiken, Kim Jones, Byron Kim, Robin Lowe, Steven Pippin, Katy Schimert, Kiki Smith, and Jane & Louise Wilson.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the items include: poster for a collaborative exhibition by Byron Kim and Glenn Ligon, and a poster for a group exhibition titled In Your Face that included Janine Antoni, Louise Bourgeois, Suzanne Coffey, Mary Beth Edelson, Tracy Essoglou, Deb Kass, Kiki Smith, and Kazuko.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains drawings, collages, and printed materials layered on top of each other. Some of the pictured items include: a photo of Paul Bloodgood pointing to something, a drawing, and a text collage.) 

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018

Paul Bloodgood Page as Essay (Page 7), 1996 Text collage 14.25 x 11.25 inches (Frontal view of Page as Essay (Page 7), a framed text collage that reads: What has happened? / We have developed a curious habit of supposing that any artist who fails to begin by shocking, by being sufficiently laughed at and insulted, must be third-rate. If he fails to stagger us, or raise our eyebrows, he is nonexistent. / In this fashion, painting has fallen an unhappy prey to the prompt and powerful techniques of  / advertising / and the stock / exchange. There are glue marks and other stain on the piece of paper where the texts are pasted.)

Paul Bloodgood

Page as Essay (Page 7), 1996

Text collage

14.25 × 11.25 inches

Paul Bloodgood Three dividing, two uniting, 2007 Oil on canvas 92.5 x 76.5 inches (Frontal view of Three dividing, two uniting, a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown.)

Paul Bloodgood

Three dividing, two uniting, 2007

Oil on canvas

92.5 × 76.5 inches

Press Release

“Paul Bloodgood’s … paintings are filled with decisions about color, scale, surface and placement that seem unpredictable and wrong – therefore the paintings feel right and fermenting.” – Jerry Saltz, 1993.

White Columns is proud to present a survey exhibition of the work of Paul Bloodgood (1960-2018.)

Paul died on May 4, 2018 from early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The exhibition, which was initiated in late 2017, now functions as both a retrospective of his work (from 1993-2017) and as a testament and a memorial to his extraordinary spirit. The exhibition has been organized in close collaboration with Paul’s family and friends.

Paul studied at Yale and Maine College of Art. He moved to New York in 1986 where, with a group of artist-friends, he founded Art Cart, an artist-run art transportation and installation company that continues to this day (as Art Crating, Inc.). Paul was also a co-founder with his colleagues from Art Cart of the now legendary AC Project Room gallery, an independent, artist-run commercial gallery that operated in Lower Manhattan between 1989 and 2001. In a 1993 statement, AC Project Room was (modestly) described as a “small, independent exhibition space for the working artist community.”  Over its 20-year life the gallery would introduce and support the work of an extraordinary community of artists inc. Doug Aitken, Michel Auder, Paul Bloodgood himself, Robert Breer, Anne Chu, Isa Genzken, Joseph Grigely, Kim Jones, Byron Kim, Christina Mackie, Josiah McElheny, Kristin Oppenheim, Katy Schimert, Jane and Louise Wilson, among countless others.

Throughout, Bloodgood focused on his own work that oscillated between painting (and for the most part abstract, or near-abstract painting) and his persistent interest in language, literature and text. Bloodgood exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at AC Project Room; and Daniel Newburg (1990); Sandra Gering (1993 and 1995); Gavin Brown’s enterprise (1994); and Newman Popiashvili (2010 and 2012), among others. With friends Leonard Bullock and Greg Kwiatek, his work was the subject of a three-artist exhibition (with accompanying catalog) at David Zwirner in 2008.

Writing in 1995, critic Jeanne Siegel astutely observed that: “Bloodgood’s painting has rejected the heroic, the commercial, the decorative, and the deconstructive tradition that persist in American abstraction. The result is a certain modesty, but it is not without strength.” Writing in 2000 about Paul’s 1999 exhibition at AC Project Room, writer Eileen Myles observed that: “[Bloodgood’s paintings] singly and serially emit a lively intensity. There’s a crackling freshness each time the motif morphs into its next incarnation.” Adding that she, “… realized that despite its self-referential construction and dense art historical references, [Bloodgood’s exhibition] was the most fluid and ethereal of shows.”

Despite suffering a traumatic brain injury – as a result of a 2010 mugging – Bloodgood continued to work in the studio until 2017.  The White Columns exhibition includes works made between 1993 and 2017, including a number of Bloodgood’s seminal text-collage ‘poems’ produced from the mid-1990s. Three vitrines will present a selection of materials relating to the AC Project Room; the original art work for Bloodgood’s 1995 artist’s book published by White Columns’ director Matthew Higgs in London; and a display of Paul’s drawings, collages, research materials and works on paper.

Together these artworks and materials provide an incomplete, and by necessity partial, overview of Paul Bloodgood’s life and work. Our hope is that the exhibition acts as an introduction (or re-introduction) to an artist who made an extraordinary contribution to New York’s cultural life, and that it might function as a catalyst for future exhibitions, further research, and the idea that one day a full retrospective of Bloodgood’s work will take place.

Paul Bloodgood, 1960-2018. He is greatly missed.

White Columns would like to sincerely thank Paul’s family and friends for their enthusiasm and support. We would like to express our sincere thanks to those individuals who made a financial contribution in support of the exhibition. Special thanks go to Kelly Adams, Leonard Bullock, Christine Burgin, Janice Guy, Byron Kim, Greg Kwiatek, and everyone at Art Crating, Inc. for their invaluable support.

For information or images contact: info@whitecolumns.org

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are twelve abstract paintings of varying sizes and one text collage: three works installed on the left wall and ten on the back wall. In the foreground of the image in the lower left corner is a partial view of a vitrine including printed material.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Eight works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: three on the left wall and five on the right. With the exception of the text collage on the far right, all the works pictured consist of abstract paintings.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are thirteen abstract paintings varying in size: ten paintings are installed on the back wall and three on the right.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Seven works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: four on the right and three on the left. The four paintings on the right share certain aesthetic similarities including airier compositions with lots of negative space, uncertain marks that resemble characteristics of a landscape and scrambled perspectives. The three on the right are denser in composition, share more decisive marks, and are flatter in perspective.) 
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Frontal view of a wall with an arched entrance to the foyer of the gallery. A framed text collage, Page as Essay (Page 2); flames, confusion, + car is installed on the left side of the arch. On the right side of the arch another framed text collage, Jack's Name Painting, is installed on top of an abstract, modestly sized, landscape orientation painting titled Valis Study. Valis Study depicts a few organic marks, some black and some marbled with earth tones and light blues, on an off-white background. To the far right of the wall is a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting titled Three dividing, two uniting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown. A text poem and painting on a wall in the foyer are also visible through the arch.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Four works installed on two walls in the foyer of the gallery- each wall has a framed text collage to the left of a painting. Between the two walls is the entrance to an adjacent gallery. The text collages are identical in size. The landscape-orientation painting on the right wall, Study for Dover-Foxcroft is smaller than X After 1000, the portrait orientation painting on the right wall. Both paintings depict expressive natural scenes in similar styles, with slightly different compositions and perspectives. Study for Dover-Foxcroft has a clear horizon that separates the muted sky from the lush field of grass. The ground is full of rocks and a few trees with foliage while there are lots of bare, twisted branches throughout the whole painting. X After 1000 evokes the perspective and compositions of older Chinese landscape scroll paintings, featuring tall rocks and a few trees in a diagonal formation from the bottom left corner to the top right corner and some trees and shrubs in the foreground.) 
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with one white column in the middle. There are three vitrines leading to a wall in the background which has two arches that lead to the foyer of the gallery. On the wall there are two works installed all the way to the left, two in between the arches, and two on the right.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the items include: a poster for Isa Genzken,  signed cards, a publication from 303 Gallery, and a poster for a group exhibition titled Poor Man's Pudding Rich Man's Crumb which included Doug Aiken, Kim Jones, Byron Kim, Robin Lowe, Steven Pippin, Katy Schimert, Kiki Smith, and Jane & Louise Wilson.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the items include: poster for a collaborative exhibition by Byron Kim and Glenn Ligon, and a poster for a group exhibition titled In Your Face that included Janine Antoni, Louise Bourgeois, Suzanne Coffey, Mary Beth Edelson, Tracy Essoglou, Deb Kass, Kiki Smith, and Kazuko.)
Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains drawings, collages, and printed materials layered on top of each other. Some of the pictured items include: a photo of Paul Bloodgood pointing to something, a drawing, and a text collage.) 
Paul Bloodgood Page as Essay (Page 7), 1996 Text collage 14.25 x 11.25 inches (Frontal view of Page as Essay (Page 7), a framed text collage that reads: What has happened? / We have developed a curious habit of supposing that any artist who fails to begin by shocking, by being sufficiently laughed at and insulted, must be third-rate. If he fails to stagger us, or raise our eyebrows, he is nonexistent. / In this fashion, painting has fallen an unhappy prey to the prompt and powerful techniques of  / advertising / and the stock / exchange. There are glue marks and other stain on the piece of paper where the texts are pasted.)
Paul Bloodgood Three dividing, two uniting, 2007 Oil on canvas 92.5 x 76.5 inches (Frontal view of Three dividing, two uniting, a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are twelve abstract paintings of varying sizes and one text collage: three works installed on the left wall and ten on the back wall. In the foreground of the image in the lower left corner is a partial view of a vitrine including printed material.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Eight works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: three on the left wall and five on the right. With the exception of the text collage on the far right, all the works pictured consist of abstract paintings.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with two white columns down the middle. On the walls in the background are thirteen abstract paintings varying in size: ten paintings are installed on the back wall and three on the right.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Seven works of varying sizes installed around the corner of two walls: four on the right and three on the left. The four paintings on the right share certain aesthetic similarities including airier compositions with lots of negative space, uncertain marks that resemble characteristics of a landscape and scrambled perspectives. The three on the right are denser in composition, share more decisive marks, and are flatter in perspective.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Frontal view of a wall with an arched entrance to the foyer of the gallery. A framed text collage, Page as Essay (Page 2); flames, confusion, + car is installed on the left side of the arch. On the right side of the arch another framed text collage, Jack’s Name Painting, is installed on top of an abstract, modestly sized, landscape orientation painting titled Valis Study. Valis Study depicts a few organic marks, some black and some marbled with earth tones and light blues, on an off-white background. To the far right of the wall is a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting titled Three dividing, two uniting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown. A text poem and painting on a wall in the foyer are also visible through the arch.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (Four works installed on two walls in the foyer of the gallery- each wall has a framed text collage to the left of a painting. Between the two walls is the entrance to an adjacent gallery. The text collages are identical in size. The landscape-orientation painting on the right wall, Study for Dover-Foxcroft is smaller than X After 1000, the portrait orientation painting on the right wall. Both paintings depict expressive natural scenes in similar styles, with slightly different compositions and perspectives. Study for Dover-Foxcroft has a clear horizon that separates the muted sky from the lush field of grass. The ground is full of rocks and a few trees with foliage while there are lots of bare, twisted branches throughout the whole painting. X After 1000 evokes the perspective and compositions of older Chinese landscape scroll paintings, featuring tall rocks and a few trees in a diagonal formation from the bottom left corner to the top right corner and some trees and shrubs in the foreground.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (View of a gallery with one white column in the middle. There are three vitrines leading to a wall in the background which has two arches that lead to the foyer of the gallery. On the wall there are two works installed all the way to the left, two in between the arches, and two on the right.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the pictured items include: a poster for Isa Genzken,  signed cards, a publication from 303 Gallery, and a poster for a group exhibition titled Poor Man’s Pudding Rich Man’s Crumb which included Doug Aiken, Kim Jones, Byron Kim, Robin Lowe, Steven Pippin, Katy Schimert, Kiki Smith, and Jane & Louise Wilson.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains various printed ephemera related to the AC Project room layered on top of each other. Some of the pictured items include: poster for a collaborative exhibition by Byron Kim and Glenn Ligon, and a poster for a group exhibition titled In Your Face that included Janine Antoni, Louise Bourgeois, Suzanne Coffey, Mary Beth Edelson, Tracy Essoglou, Deb Kass, Kiki Smith, and Kazuko.)

Paul Bloodgood, installation view, 2018 (A close-up view of Vitrine 1, which contains drawings, collages, and printed materials layered on top of each other. Some of the pictured items include: a photo of Paul Bloodgood pointing to something, a drawing, and a text collage.)

Paul Bloodgood Page as Essay (Page 7), 1996 Text collage 14.25 × 11.25 inches (Frontal view of Page as Essay (Page 7), a framed text collage that reads: What has happened? / We have developed a curious habit of supposing that any artist who fails to begin by shocking, by being sufficiently laughed at and insulted, must be third-rate. If he fails to stagger us, or raise our eyebrows, he is nonexistent. / In this fashion, painting has fallen an unhappy prey to the prompt and powerful techniques of  / advertising / and the stock / exchange. There are glue marks and other stain on the piece of paper where the texts are pasted.)

Paul Bloodgood Three dividing, two uniting, 2007 Oil on canvas 92.5 × 76.5 inches (Frontal view of Three dividing, two uniting, a large, abstract, portrait-orientation painting with marks and colors evocative of natural features including trees, lakes, and mountains in grey, green, and various shades of blue and brown.)