HEALING ARTS!
Work from the archives of Healing Arts Initiative

September 24–November 2, 2019 East Gallery
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle. Between the columns are two vitrines. In the background on the walls is a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on paper. The works on the walls are organized by artist, with each artist showing four or five works grouped together in a row and bordered with a brightly colored line, such as yellow, green, or pink. These groups are installed in a playful manner and are connected by lines of the same color. Many of the works are figurative in nature and utilize bright colors.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups with the exception of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs, which are installed and bordered individually. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Melvin Way’s drawings are displayed under glass.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle and an arched entryway on the right wall. There are two display tables, each installed between the columns and a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on the walls.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Installation view of various artists’ works on the walls. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Jose Lopez’s intricate patterned drawings are displayed under glass. On the bottom of the right wall is a row of figurative paintings by Everette Ball. The paintings, which are drawn from photographs of him and his friends, focus only on the figures and select elements from their immediate surroundings, leaving most of the page white.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups and bordered by pink, yellow, or green lines on a wall. Most of the works are figurative, including Jenny Maruki’s paintings which are installed in a row on the far right, in the middle of the wall. The paintings depict rows of simply depicted women in profile wearing large skirts in either a solid or simply patterned background.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of a section of a wall including groups of four or five works by Lady Shalimar Montague installed at the top, Adeyinka Perry in the middle, and Rocco Fama on the bottom. Lady Shalimar Montague’s works depict ornately dressed dancers and performers surrounded by cursive text. Perry’s works depict reimagined maps of Africa and the Caribbean with brightly colored land masses in fields of blue. Fama’s works intricately depict frontal views of tall brick buildings along with the street and trees in front of it, almost filling the entire page. One of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs depicting 34th Street Penn Station is also installed to the right of Perry’s work.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of two identically sized portraits by Derrick Alexis Coard installed one above the other, bordered by a pink line. Both works are portraits of bearded Black men. The work on the top depicts the subject from the shoulders up, in 3/4 view. The figure is wearing a straw hat with a blue band and a blue shirt and coat. The portrait on the bottom is a tightly cropped frontal view of a man's face on a dark purple background.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A section of a wall with five works by Julius Caesar Bustamante in the center, surrounded by various artist’s works in each corner. All of Bustamante’s drawings utilize similar palettes of bright, poppy colors, and depict fantastical natural scenes through overlapping images including blue mushrooms, people in masks, monkeys, elephants, various birds and fish, and diverse foliage, often with themes of Mesoamerican culture in cartoon-like renderings.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of Thomas Hall's reimagined street sign for 34th Street. The piece reads: "34th Street Penn Station Long Island Railroad Amtrk Trains Metro North New Jersey Transit" in hand-drawn block letters filled in with various colors on a pink piece of landscape-orientation paper. His name is on the top right corner as well as the day the piece was made, 05/15/01. The piece is bordered by a green line. 

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of work in a vitrine. The painting by Martha Cruz is done on the left page of a found book and depicts two cartoon like figures, walking, rendered in ballpoint pen. The figures are framed by orange lines and their clothes are colored in blocks of red, blue, purple and green, but their faces and hair are simple line drawings. The figure in the front is raising their left hand.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of two works on sketchbooks displayed in a vitrine: the top one by Lady Shalimar Montague and the bottom one by George Knerr. The work on top depicts a stylized figure with green hat, colored in orange with gold polka dots. To the right of the figure are the words “Olga Petrova” Russian Ballerina” in all caps. The bottom work depicts a yellow and blue target in a red rectangle, on an orange background. The date, June 17, and the artist’s name are written in the bottom right corner of the page.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of works by Jose Lopez and Melvin Way installed in a vitrine. Lopez’s four intricate drawings are arranged on the left half of the table. The work to the far left is on rough piece of brown paper. The other three are black line drawings on white paper with a black border. On the left side are Way’s nine small drawings arranged in a three by three grid. The dense drawings are filled with micro texts and symbols, surrounded by bold areas of black or blue ink.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of open sketchbook by various artists, including Lady Shalimar Montague, Martha Cruz, George Knerr, Kenny Mckay, and Oscar Brown installed on a display table. Mckay’s sketchbook is installed in the far right corner, and has the phrase “You brush your hare I comb my rabbit” on the left page, and a simple line drawing of a cartoon face on the right.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of one of Melvin Way’s drawings. It is made of four different sized rectangular paper attached vertically and is filled with chemical symbols and areas filled out with black or blue ink.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019

Participating Artists

Everette Ball, Oscar Brown, Julius Caesar Bustamante, Donna Caesar, Derrick Alexis Coard, Martha Cruz, Rocco Fama, Carl Greenberg, Thomas Hall, Ray Hamilton, Mercedes Jamison, Roger Jones, George Knerr, Paul Kordas, Jose Lopez, Jenny Maruki, Kenny Mckay, Gaetana Menna, Lady Shalimar Montague, Donnell Murray, Adeyinka Perry, Michael Peruggia, Irene Phillips, and Melvin Way.

Press Release

White Columns is proud to present the first-ever exhibition to consider the legacy of the ground- breaking New York not-for-profit organization, Healing Arts Initiative (aka Hospital Audiences Inc./H.A.I.). The exhibition will include more than one hundred works by twenty-four artists who were affiliated with H.A.I. during its nearly five-decade lifespan.

Founded in 1970 and originally known as Hospital Audiences Inc., H.A.I.’s pioneering mission was to “inspire healing, growth and learning through engagement in the arts for the culturally underserved in the New York City community… whose access to the arts have been limited by health, age or income.” H.A.I. was dissolved in 2016 after a series of tragic events forced the organization into bankruptcy. White Columns was instrumental in helping to preserve the organization’s four-decade- plus archive of art produced under H.A.I.’s auspices: an unprecedented and historically significant collection of several thousand individual art works.

This exhibition is drawn from these archival holdings and focuses on the legacy of H.A.I.’s long- running visual art programs, which for over forty years fostered and provided support to an extraordinary community of mostly self-taught artists based in New York City, many of whom were elderly or living with physical or developmental disabilities. H.A.I.’s programs for artists began as workshops for individuals living in private proprietary adult homes (PPHAs), and it was at these workshops in the late 1970s and early 1980s that Lady Shalimar Montague, Ray Hamilton, Irene Phillips and Rocco Fama, four of the earliest and now most widely-recognized H.A.I. artists, began to make art. Over time H.A.I.’s Arts Workshop program evolved to include the H.A.I. Studio & Gallery which provided artists with studio space, materials, exhibition opportunities, and – perhaps most crucially – a sense of community. Over its lifetime H.A.I. supported hundreds of artists including such now acknowledged figures as Melvin Way, Julius Caesar Bustamante, and Derrick Alexis Coard, among others.

The present exhibition can only offer a partial account of the extraordinary range of work that was created at H.A.I. between 1970s and 2016. Many of the artists associated with H.A.I. remain active in the New York arts community, some now working with like-minded organizations including Fountain House Gallery and Y.A.I. Our hope is that this exhibition functions as an introduction to H.A.I. and that it might also act as a catalyst for further research and future exhibitions about this radical and inclusive arts organization and the many artists it supported.

White Columns has collaborated extensively with H.A.I. in the recent past including staging widely- acknowledged solo exhibitions by H.A.I.-affiliated artists Derrick Alexis Coard, Lady Shalimar Montague, Rocco Fama and Ray Hamilton; and in 2014 White Columns presented a display of work by H.A.I.-affiliated artists at Frieze, New York. The exhibition expands upon White Columns now 15- year commitment to supporting the work of artists with disabilities in collaboration with the art centers and studio programs that support them, including our past projects developed with: Creative Growth Art Center, Oakland, CA; Visionaries & Voices, Cincinnati; Fountain House Gallery, New York; First Street Gallery, Claremont, CA; N.I.A.D., Richmond, CA; and Gateway Arts, Boston, MA, among others.

White Columns would like to thank Quimetta Perle and all of the former staff of H.A.I. for their enthusiastic support and assistance with this, and earlier projects. We would also like to acknowledge Jay Gorney for making the original introduction between White Columns and H.A.I.

 

Participating artists: Everette Ball, Oscar Brown, Julius Caesar Bustamante, Donna Caesar, Derrick Alexis Coard, Martha Cruz, Rocco Fama, Carl Greenberg, Thomas Hall, Ray Hamilton, Mercedes Jamison, Roger Jones, George Knerr, Paul Kordas, Jose Lopez, Jenny Maruki, Kenny Mckay, Gaetana Menna, Lady Shalimar Montague, Donnell Murray, Adeyinka Perry, Michael Peruggia, Irene Phillips, and Melvin Way.

To learn more about H.A.I.’s original mission visit their archived page at:

https://www.nycservice.org/organizations/857

For further information, contact: info@whitecolumns.org

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle. Between the columns are two vitrines. In the background on the walls is a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on paper. The works on the walls are organized by artist, with each artist showing four or five works grouped together in a row and bordered with a brightly colored line, such as yellow, green, or pink. These groups are installed in a playful manner and are connected by lines of the same color. Many of the works are figurative in nature and utilize bright colors.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups with the exception of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs, which are installed and bordered individually. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Melvin Way’s drawings are displayed under glass.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle and an arched entryway on the right wall. There are two display tables, each installed between the columns and a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on the walls.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Installation view of various artists’ works on the walls. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Jose Lopez’s intricate patterned drawings are displayed under glass. On the bottom of the right wall is a row of figurative paintings by Everette Ball. The paintings, which are drawn from photographs of him and his friends, focus only on the figures and select elements from their immediate surroundings, leaving most of the page white.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups and bordered by pink, yellow, or green lines on a wall. Most of the works are figurative, including Jenny Maruki’s paintings which are installed in a row on the far right, in the middle of the wall. The paintings depict rows of simply depicted women in profile wearing large skirts in either a solid or simply patterned background.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of a section of a wall including groups of four or five works by Lady Shalimar Montague installed at the top, Adeyinka Perry in the middle, and Rocco Fama on the bottom. Lady Shalimar Montague’s works depict ornately dressed dancers and performers surrounded by cursive text. Perry’s works depict reimagined maps of Africa and the Caribbean with brightly colored land masses in fields of blue. Fama’s works intricately depict frontal views of tall brick buildings along with the street and trees in front of it, almost filling the entire page. One of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs depicting 34th Street Penn Station is also installed to the right of Perry’s work.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of two identically sized portraits by Derrick Alexis Coard installed one above the other, bordered by a pink line. Both works are portraits of bearded Black men. The work on the top depicts the subject from the shoulders up, in 3/4 view. The figure is wearing a straw hat with a blue band and a blue shirt and coat. The portrait on the bottom is a tightly cropped frontal view of a man's face on a dark purple background.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A section of a wall with five works by Julius Caesar Bustamante in the center, surrounded by various artist’s works in each corner. All of Bustamante’s drawings utilize similar palettes of bright, poppy colors, and depict fantastical natural scenes through overlapping images including blue mushrooms, people in masks, monkeys, elephants, various birds and fish, and diverse foliage, often with themes of Mesoamerican culture in cartoon-like renderings.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of Thomas Hall's reimagined street sign for 34th Street. The piece reads: "34th Street Penn Station Long Island Railroad Amtrk Trains Metro North New Jersey Transit" in hand-drawn block letters filled in with various colors on a pink piece of landscape-orientation paper. His name is on the top right corner as well as the day the piece was made, 05/15/01. The piece is bordered by a green line. 
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of work in a vitrine. The painting by Martha Cruz is done on the left page of a found book and depicts two cartoon like figures, walking, rendered in ballpoint pen. The figures are framed by orange lines and their clothes are colored in blocks of red, blue, purple and green, but their faces and hair are simple line drawings. The figure in the front is raising their left hand.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of two works on sketchbooks displayed in a vitrine: the top one by Lady Shalimar Montague and the bottom one by George Knerr. The work on top depicts a stylized figure with green hat, colored in orange with gold polka dots. To the right of the figure are the words “Olga Petrova” Russian Ballerina” in all caps. The bottom work depicts a yellow and blue target in a red rectangle, on an orange background. The date, June 17, and the artist’s name are written in the bottom right corner of the page.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of works by Jose Lopez and Melvin Way installed in a vitrine. Lopez’s four intricate drawings are arranged on the left half of the table. The work to the far left is on rough piece of brown paper. The other three are black line drawings on white paper with a black border. On the left side are Way’s nine small drawings arranged in a three by three grid. The dense drawings are filled with micro texts and symbols, surrounded by bold areas of black or blue ink.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of open sketchbook by various artists, including Lady Shalimar Montague, Martha Cruz, George Knerr, Kenny Mckay, and Oscar Brown installed on a display table. Mckay’s sketchbook is installed in the far right corner, and has the phrase “You brush your hare I comb my rabbit” on the left page, and a simple line drawing of a cartoon face on the right.)
HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of one of Melvin Way’s drawings. It is made of four different sized rectangular paper attached vertically and is filled with chemical symbols and areas filled out with black or blue ink.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle. Between the columns are two vitrines. In the background on the walls is a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on paperThe works on the walls are organized by artist, with each artist showing four or five works grouped together in a row and bordered with a brightly colored line, such as yellow, green, or pink. These groups are installed in a playful manner and are connected by lines of the same color. Many of the works are figurative in nature and utilize bright colors.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups with the exception of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs, which are installed and bordered individually. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Melvin Way’s drawings are displayed under glass.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A view of a gallery with three white columns down the middle and an arched entryway on the right wall. There are two display tables, each installed between the columns and a whimsical installation of various artists’ works on the walls.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Installation view of various artists’ works on the walls. In the foreground of the image in the lower right corner is a partial view of a vitrine in which Jose Lopez’s intricate patterned drawings are displayed under glass. On the bottom of the right wall is a row of figurative paintings by Everette Ball. The paintings, which are drawn from photographs of him and his friends, focus only on the figures and select elements from their immediate surroundings, leaving most of the page white.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Various artists’ works installed in groups and bordered by pink, yellow, or green lines on a wall. Most of the works are figurative, including Jenny Maruki’s paintings which are installed in a row on the far right, in the middle of the wall. The paintings depict rows of simply depicted women in profile wearing large skirts in either a solid or simply patterned background.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of a section of a wall including groups of four or five works by Lady Shalimar Montague installed at the top, Adeyinka Perry in the middle, and Rocco Fama on the bottom. Lady Shalimar Montague’s works depict ornately dressed dancers and performers surrounded by cursive text. Perry’s works depict reimagined maps of Africa and the Caribbean with brightly colored land masses in fields of blue. Fama’s works intricately depict frontal views of tall brick buildings along with the street and trees in front of it, almost filling the entire page. One of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street signs depicting 34th Street Penn Station is also installed to the right of Perry’s work.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of two identically sized portraits by Derrick Alexis Coard installed one above the other, bordered by a pink line. Both works are portraits of bearded Black men. The work on the top depicts the subject from the shoulders up, in 3/4 view. The figure is wearing a straw hat with a blue band and a blue shirt and coat. The portrait on the bottom is a tightly cropped frontal view of a man’s face on a dark purple background.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A section of a wall with five works by Julius Caesar Bustamante in the center, surrounded by various artist’s works in each corner. All of Bustamante’s drawings utilize similar palettes of bright, poppy colors, and depict fantastical natural scenes through overlapping images including blue mushrooms, people in masks, monkeys, elephants, various birds and fish, and diverse foliage, often with themes of Mesoamerican culture in cartoon-like renderings.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A frontal view of Thomas Hall’s reimagined street sign for 34th Street. The piece reads: “34th Street Penn Station Long Island Railroad Amtrk Trains Metro North New Jersey Transit” in hand-drawn block letters filled in with various colors on a pink piece of landscape-orientation paper. His name is on the top right corner as well as the day the piece was made, 05/15/01. The piece is bordered by a green line.

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of work in a vitrine. The painting by Martha Cruz is done on the left page of a found book and depicts two cartoon like figures, walking, rendered in ballpoint penThe figures are framed by orange lines and their clothes are colored in blocks of red, blue, purple and green, but their faces and hair are simple line drawings. The figure in the front is raising their left hand.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of two works on sketchbooks displayed in a vitrine: the top one by Lady Shalimar Montague and the bottom one by George Knerr. The work on top depicts a stylized figure with green hat, colored in orange with gold polka dots. To the right of the figure are the words “Olga Petrova” Russian Ballerina” in all caps. The bottom work depicts a yellow and blue target in a red rectangle, on an orange background. The date, June 17, and the artist’s name are written in the bottom right corner of the page.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of works by Jose Lopez and Melvin Way installed in a vitrine. Lopez’s four intricate drawings are arranged on the left half of the table. The work to the far left is on rough piece of brown paper. The other three are black line drawings on white paper with a black border. On the left side are Way’s nine small drawings arranged in a three by three grid. The dense drawings are filled with micro texts and symbols, surrounded by bold areas of black or blue ink.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (Aerial view of open sketchbook by various artists, including Lady Shalimar Montague, Martha Cruz, George Knerr, Kenny Mckay, and Oscar Brown installed on a display table. Mckay’s sketchbook is installed in the far right corner, and has the phrase “You brush your hare I comb my rabbit” on the left page, and a simple line drawing of a cartoon face on the right.)

HEALING ARTS!, installation view, 2019 (A close up view of one of Melvin Way’s drawings. It is made of four different sized rectangular paper attached vertically and is filled with chemical symbols and areas filled out with black or blue ink.)